State and local inquiry standards and STEM Connections

 

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State and Local Inquiry Standards--Embedded Throughout All Projects

·         Recognize the steps of the scientific method.

·         Formulate a testable hypothesis.

·         Apply the steps of the scientific method by designing and carrying out an investigation specifying variables to be changed, controlled and measured.

·         Clearly specify the units of measurement for all variables.

·         Differentiate between questions that can be answered through direct investigation and those that cannot.

·         Apply personal experience and knowledge to make predictions.

·         Apply multiple lines of inquiry to address and analyze a question, e.g. experimentation, trial and error, survey, interview, and secondary sources.

·         Select appropriate tools and technology (e.g. calculators, computers, thermometers, meter sticks, balances, graduated cylinders, and microscopes) and make quantitative observations.

·         Present and explain data and findings using multiple representations, including tables, graphs, mathematical and physical models, and demonstrations.

·         Clearly show data from multiple trials.

·         Draw conclusions based on data or evidence presented in tables or graphs, and make inferences based on patterns or trends in the data.

·         Communicate procedures and results using appropriate science and technology terminology.

     Offer explanations of procedures, and critique and revise them.

 

 

Project

Examples of State & Local Frameworks & Progress Indicators

Pressure Treated Wood

(Arsenic & Soil)

•Explain how the balance of an ecosystem can be upset if living or non-living factors are introduced or remove

•Give examples of basic chemical compounds.

•State the elements that compose basic compounds.

•Demonstrate differences between basic chemical compounds.

•Explain that a mixture of substances often can be separated into the original substances using one or more of the characteristic properties of the substances.

•Differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes

Water (Rainfall, Streams, Pollution)

•Explain how the balance of an ecosystem can be upset if living or non-living factors are introduced or removed.

•Explain how dead plants and animals are broken down by other living organisms and how this process contributes to the system as a whole.

•Recognize that the measurement of volume and mass requires understanding of the sensitivity of measurement tools (e.g., [metric] rulers, graduated cylinders, balances) and knowledge and appropriate use of significant digits.

•Show that the accuracy of the data is appropriate to the measuring tools being used.

•Define and explain an element.

•Identify and give examples of common elements and their chemical symbol.

•Classify substances as metals, nonmetals, or metalloids based on their physical properties and reactions to chemicals.

•Explain how acidic, basic, and neutral solutions react with litmus paper and indicators.

•Define pH and describe how to determine the pH of a solution.

•Recognize, interpret, and be able to create models of the earth’s common physical features in various mapping representations, including contour maps.

•Describe and give examples of ways in which the earth’s surface is built up and torn down by natural processes, including deposition of sediments, rock formation, erosion, and weathering.

Ground-level Stratospheric

Ozone

•Explain how the balance of an ecosystem can be upset if living or non-living factors are introduced or removed.

•Recognize that the measurement of volume and mass requires understanding of the sensitivity of measurement tools (e.g., [metric] rulers, graduated cylinders, balances) and knowledge and appropriate use of significant digits.

•Show that the accuracy of the data is appropriate to the measuring tools being used

•Demonstrate an understanding of the organization of the periodic table of the elements.

•Investigate and illustrate ways in which human activities, such as reducing the amount of forest cover, increasing the amount and variety of chemicals released into the atmosphere, and intensive farming, have changed the Earth’s land, oceans, and atmosphere.

•Explain the relationship among the energy provided by the sun, the global patterns of atmospheric movement, and the temperature differences among water, land, and atmosphere.

•Describe variables that influence how much of the Sun’s heat is absorbed and released by different surfaces.

•Explain why the temperature of an air mass depends on the temperature of the Earth’s surface directly beneath the air mass.

Ecology and

Behavior of Birds

•Identify the characteristics of living things.

•Define and give examples of traits.

Describe and give examples of adaptations.

•Give examples of ways in which organisms interact and have different functions within an ecosystem that enable the ecosystem to survive.

•Differentiate organisms according to physical characteristics and traits.

•Explain the importance of scientific names.

•Explain the need for the science of taxonomy of living things.

Fast Plants and

Bottle Biology

•Identify the characteristics of living things.

•Define and give examples of traits.

•Recognize that producers (plants that contain chlorophyll) use the energy from sunlight to make sugars from carbon dioxide and water through a process called photosynthesis. This food can be used immediately, stored for later use, or used by other organisms.

•Identify basic plant anatomy.

•Describe the process of pollination and fertilization in flowering plants.

•Explain how the balance of an ecosystem can be upset if living or non-living factors are introduced or removed.

Pollen and Seed

Cell Growth

•Identify the characteristics of living things.

•Define and give examples of traits.

•Identify basic plant anatomy.

•Describe the process of pollination and fertilization in flowering plants.